Wyoming vs Nevada vs Delaware

Where You Should Incorporate

 Nevada-vs-Wyoming -Delaware - Side By Side Comparison -Why Wyoming

Nevada vs. Wyoming

Wyoming state fees are 84% less than Nevada’s. That includes the Nevada “hidden” officer filing fees of $125 that you learn about only after you start your company there, a fee Nevada will hit you within 30 days after you start your company!   Oh, and the state business license fee of $200 per year!  We bet they did not tell you about that “after-the-fact” fee either.

Wyoming has no business license fees or officer filing fees. This means we can deliver a quality company package for much less than you would pay in Nevada. And, your Wyoming state renewal fee is $50, in most cases, 84% less than what you will pay in Nevada. And, the nice thing about Wyoming is that is not the only reason to incorporate here.  Wyoming is one of the most cost effective states to incorporate in and also to maintain in following years.  (Click here for pricing.)

According to the new 2014 edition of the Tax Foundation’s State Business Tax Climate Index, “Wyoming has the most business-friendly tax system of any state,” for the past 6 years in a row.

Perhaps you’re one of those who have read all the web sites that promote incorporating your business in Nevada. The reasons given usually are:

1. Nevada does not share information with the IRS.

Wyoming Answer: Nevada makes the IRS mad. Wyoming does share information with the IRS, but only the information given by companies with real assets inside the state. So the IRS is not targeting you because you are in a non-friendly state (like they may in Nevada).

2. Nevada allows bearer shares.

Wyoming Answer: Nevada’s law did not say anything about bearer shares, but that law was changed in 2007 to disallow bearer shares. If you think you need bearer shares, call us first. You are most likely being misled.  All states have outlawed bearer shares.

3. Nevada has privacy.

Wyoming Answer: Go to the Secretary of State of Nevada’s web site and type in a person’s last name and/or first name. You will see a list of all companies that person is a part of in Nevada. Go to the Secretary of State of Wyoming’s website and you will find that the only way to search on a company is by company name. You cannot search using a person’s name.

4. No taxes in Nevada.

Wyoming Answer: No state income taxes on people or companies in Wyoming and Wyoming is not considering any–, Nevada is.  Nevada has a bill being voted on in November of 2014 installing a corporate gross receipts tax of 2% (no deductions allowed).  That will mean that some companies in Nevada will pay more in state taxes than they would in California!  In fact some Nevada companies will be paying one of the highest state taxes in the nation!

The bottom line, don’t gamble on Nevada.

Exploding the Delaware Myth

You may have heard that Delaware is the “incorporation capital” of America. It’s true! More than 60% of Fortune 500 companies are incorporated in Delaware. If you own a Fortune 500 company (and for your sake, we hope you do) then, by all means, you should strongly consider incorporating in Delaware. However, if you are a small- or medium-sized business that is more concerned with tax benefits, flexibility, privacy and a minimum of bureaucracy and “red tape,” then Wyoming is the clear choice for you.

You see, Delaware has an excellent body of corporate case law spanning 110 years regarding such matters as management/shareholder issues and mergers/acquisitions. That’s precisely why the Fortune 500 are drawn to the state of Delaware. Delaware laws tend to be “pro-management” when it comes to minority shareholder disputes. Huge public companies have literally hundreds of such disputes pending in the courts on any given day. So, if you are managing a Fortune 500 company, Delaware’s case law offers many insights into what you can and cannot do, and what the likely consequences may be. Unfortunately, Delaware also has corporate income tax, personal income tax, a state franchise tax, reporting requirements, and regulations compelling disclosure of substantial amounts of information resulting in far less privacy for you. We are always surprised at how many otherwise knowledgeable professionals advise their small business/ entrepreneur clients to incorporate in Delaware. Well intentioned though it may be, it is not sound advice.

Perhaps you’re one of those who received such advice and have incorporated your business in Delaware. It’s not too late! Refer to the preceding section and you will see that we can easily “move” your corporation to Wyoming, while preserving the original incorporation date.

There are more comparisons in the chart below.

A Side by Side Comparison of Wyoming and Nevada and Delaware

Benefits Nevada Wyoming Delaware
No state corporate income tax yes yes
No tax on corporate shares yes yes yes
No franchise tax yes yes
Minimal annual fees yes
One-person corporation is allowed yes yes yes
Stockholders are not revealed to the State yes yes yes
No annual report is required until the anniversary of the incorporation date yes
Unlimited stock is allowed, of any par value yes yes
Share certificates are not required yes
Minimal initial filing fees yes
No minimum capital requirements yes yes yes
Meetings may be held anywhere yes yes yes
Officers, directors, employees and agents are statutorily indemnified yes yes
Continuance procedure (allows Wyoming to adopt a corporation formed in another state) yes

Why Wyoming

As you can see from the above list, Wyoming has advantages that Nevada does not have.

Also, with the changes that Nevada has made to its laws, in 2003, 2005, 2009 and in 2012, Wyoming has become the best state in the nation to incorporate in.

If you are comparing price, Wyoming is about 35% less to incorporate in than Nevada.

Another thing that they will not tell you about Nevada. The state is running a deficit and the Nevada State Legislature has been trying to pass a corporate income tax and it came within a few votes of passing a tax, a few years ago. It is thought that they will pass some sort of business tax, in the next few years.

Wyoming is not considering any business income tax and does not need to. Wyoming has a budget surplus in 2014, as it has for a number of years now. Don’t gamble on Nevada passing a law that could cost you taxes after you incorporate there.